Jan. 7, 2017


The unarmed man who assisted with racial suicide was presumed to be a white man.

He was presumed to have God like powers, which were hidden and then found in his economic resources.

He was presumed to be somewhat of a sorcerous.

His most powerful attribute was his ability to manipulate, segregate, and annihilate any and all people outside of his race who stood in his way. 

He was presumed to be a threat, solely because of the color of his skin.

He was presumed to be the greatest catalyst for the failure of a great number of " black men".

He was presumed to be the most entitled because his skin color ensured entitlement.

He was presumed to be the most confident because his skin color guaranteed confidence.

He was hated by most, primarily because of the history of his ancestors.

He was significant because he was politically, socially, and economically accepted.

Meanwhile, the other races of people were politically, socially, and economically rejected.

However, this rejection was partially seduced and taken by fear. We, I , they, him, her, and us all feared the idea of living in the shadows of the unarmed man who assisted with racial suicide.

However, it was you, I, we, they, them, he, and she who had assisted ourselves, in our own sucide.

Although, we continue to use the unarmed man as a shield to erase our flaws, our failures, our hate, our hurt, and our stolen identities.

I am not denying that slavery continues to exists.

However, the color that separates humanity is not black nor white. It is green and it is everything else that lies in between(grey). It is education, resilience, ambition, persistence, and investment in all things of greatness.

Investment in both time and resources.

Investment in:

self, child( children), the life of the living, the values of the deceased, and the youth. They are on the verge of dying in our communities, they also have the highest suicide rate.

Is slavery still alive?  Yes, although not legally!

Slavery continues to live in us; it lives in our minds and in our hearts. It happens to bring, both, the unarmed man and humanity a great deal of misery.

I am not afraid of the unarmed man (nor woman) who once assisted with racial suicide.  I am not afraid of anyone not him, not them, not her, not she. If I am afraid of anyone, I am most afrad of  me.i